User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Donald Trump will be busy Friday.

He and Mike Pence have promised, Mother Jones magazine points out, that on Trump's first day in office he will repeal Obamacare, end the "war on coal," expel illegal immigrants, begin construction of a "beautiful Southern border wall," fix the Department of Veterans Affairs, come up with a plan to stop ISIS, get rid of "gun-free zones," "start taking care of our ... military," withdraw from the TPP trade agreement, cut regulations and designate China a currency manipulator.

OK, much of that was probably just campaign talk. I'm grateful for that. I hope some of it never happens.

But there's a lot of good Trump and Pence could do their first day, or, let's be generous, their first week. How about this?

Monday: Abolish the Department of Commerce.

Trump is a businessman, so he knows that business works best when government stays out of it. Why does America need something called a Commerce Department? Commerce just happens; it doesn't need a department.

Today the Department of Commerce spends $9 billion a year subsidizing companies with political connections, gathering economic data, setting industry standards and doing a bunch of things companies ought to do for themselves.

Get rid of it.

Tuesday: Abolish the Department of Labor.

The Department inserts itself into almost every protracted argument between workers and management. Why should we let government referee every argument? Let workers, bosses, unions and their lawyers fight it out.

Then people can make contracts as individuals so they can get deals tailored to their individual needs. That's fairer than letting government bureaucrats and labor union bosses pretend to speak for them.

The Labor Department also spends about $9 billion gathering information on workers. Top labor-union bosses make six-figure salaries. I'm sure their organizations could spend a little on statistics and workplace studies. Leave the poor, oppressed taxpayer out of it.
Wednesday: Abolish the Small Business Administration.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

President-elect Donald Trump's threats against American companies looking to relocate in foreign countries have won favorable review from many quarters. Support comes from those alarmed about trade deficits, those who want a "level playing field" and those who call for "free trade but fair trade," whatever that means.

Some American companies relocate in foreign lands because costs are lower and hence their profits are higher. Lower labor costs are not the only reason companies move to other countries.

Life Savers, a candy manufacturing company, was based in Holland, Michigan, for decades. In 2002, it moved to Montreal. It didn't move because Canada had lower wages. Canadian wages are similar to ours. The mayor of Holland offered Kraft, the parent company of Life Savers, a 15-year tax break worth $25 million to stay. But Kraft's CEO said it would save $90 million over the same period because sugar was less expensive in Canada. Congress can play favorites with U.S. sugar producers by keeping foreign sugar out, enabling them to charge higher sugar prices, earn higher profits and pay their employees higher wages. Our Congress has no power to force the Canadian Parliament to impose similar sugar import restrictions.

One of the unappreciated benefits of international trade is that it helps reveal the cost of domestic policy. For example, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration can impose high costs on American companies, but it has no jurisdiction elsewhere. Our Environmental Protection Agency can impose costly regulations on American companies, but it has no power to impose costly regulations on companies in other countries. Congress can impose costly tax burdens on American companies, but it has no power to do so abroad. Restrictions on international trade conceal these costs. My argument here is not against the costly regulations that we impose on ourselves. I am merely suggesting that we should appreciate the cost of those regulations. The fact that a good or service can be produced more cheaply elsewhere helps.

Trump's threats to impose high tariffs on the products of companies that leave ought to be a worry for us -- namely, whether we are going to have another president who flouts the U.S. Constitution. Here's how Article 1, Section 7 of our Constitution reads: "All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills." President Barack Obama has circumvented the Constitution and Congress through executive orders. His success in doing so has put too much power in the hands of the executive branch. One wonders whether Trump plans to broaden that power by implementing trade tariffs through executive order.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Press Release (RedEnergyPR)

Award-Winning Springs PR Firm Selected for Nearly a Dozen Colorado Contracts in 2017

Red Energy Public Relations, Advertising & Events, has recently been awarded 10 Springs-based public relations contracts with: Bestway Disposal, Pro River Tech, Colorado Dermatology Institute, Motif Jazz Cafe, Dog Haus, Ent Credit Union, Cedarwood Development’s Melody Living, GTL Development’s Meridian Ranch, Nor’wood Development Group and Cacao Chemistry.

“While we work with clients all over the U.S., we truly love being able to support those right here in our backyard,” said President of Red Energy Public Relations, Amy Sufak. “We know this market well and feel honored to be able to be trusted with some of the city’s most notable organizations and business leaders as we help them reach their goals of further connecting with our community.”
Bestway Disposal has retained Red Energy to support their digital marketing efforts through strategic social media management and earned news media outreach.

Red Energy was contracted to support Pro River Tech with local, regional and national news media outreach to include their recent acquisition of L&G Computer Services.

Colorado Dermatology Institute has retained Red Energy for a third consecutive contract for a comprehensive public relations campaign to include earned media, advertising management, graphic design, digital marketing, event management and community outreach.

Motif Jazz Cafe, Dog Haus, Ent Credit Union and Cacao Chemistry have contracted Red Energy to support their new location openings in 2017 to include earned media outreach support.
Red Energy has been retained to support Melody Living, a national Cedarwood Development assisted living project premiering in Colorado Springs.

GTL Development’s Meridian Ranch has contracted Red Energy for news media outreach support.
Nor’wood Development Group has retained Red Energy to support Wolf Ranch’s community outreach efforts through strategic event management.

"Our passion is to help our clients by telling their story,” said Sufak. "It’s our strategic and results-driven approach that helps us connect their unique story and vision with the greater community.”

For more information, visit RedEnergyPR.com or call 719.465.3565.

# # #
About Red Energy Public Relations, Advertising & Events
Red Energy is an award winning United States Air Force veteran, minority, woman-owned, small business. The boutique agency, with 20 + years of experience, is an international provider of events, news media interview training, crisis communication management, marketing and creative communication services. Founded in 2008, Red Energy was established on the principles of delivering excellence to every client to include non-profits, corporations and governmental entities across the nation. The Red Energy team offers an integrated approach between public relations, advertising and events that builds awareness and visibility for organizations.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

 
Press Release

Tara Custom Homes located in Colorado Springs Colorado donated over 400 hotel cabinets and doors from a hotel remodel. The donor has valued the donation at approximately at $200,000.00. Tara Custom Homes web site is www.taracustom.com.
 
Paul Rising President of Tara Custom Homes contacted the local Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity ReStore to make the arrangements for the cabinets to be delivered to the Habitat ReStore.  The ReStore is located at 411 South Wahsatch Ave Colorado Springs Colorado 80903 phone 719-477-0840.
 
Steve Church, Director of Retail & Business Development, was appreciative of the generous donation from Tara Custom Homes. The generosity of donations like this helps Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity build decent and affordable housing here in El Paso County Colorado and help families obtain the American Dream of homeownership.

The Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity ReStore is one of 855 Habitat ReStores in the United States and Canada which accepts donations of home improvement items and resells them at a fraction of the cost to generate revenue to help build homes for low income families here is El Paso County Colorado.
 
Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity is one of over 1,500 Habitat for Humanity Affiliates located in the United States.
 
Since 1983 Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity has built or rehabilitated 150 homes with families in El Paso.  For more information about Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity visit the affiliate web site at www.pikespeakhabitat.org.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Now that I no longer do a weekly TV show, I have more time to read my local paper. Sadly, that's The New York Times.

The Times actually does some good reporting, but their political and economic coverage is filled with deceit.

Can I find deceit every day? You bet. Take a look at a few days just last week.

--Thursday:

The front page: "NAFTA's promise is falling short, Mexicans agree."

Wow, the Times now embraces Donald Trump's position on trade? Economists estimate that 14 million jobs depend upon NAFTA, but people everywhere often oppose trade because the smaller number of jobs lost is more visible than gradual gains.

What evidence of NAFTA's failings does the Times offer? Oddly, the article says "the workforce has grown."

Ah, hello? Job growth is good.

Jose Luis Rico "earns well under $10,000 a year."

Not much by American standards, but good for Latin America, and the reporter mentions that Rico got "a handful of raises."

Have you gotten "a handful of raises"?

Despite NAFTA, the "gap between the nation's rich and poor persists."

Duh. Trade doesn't eliminate wealth gaps -- it may increase the gap because the cleverest traders get rich. But since the poor gain jobs and wealth, too, so what?

Finally, the clueless Times reporter quotes a Mexican politician and crony capitalist complaining: "Government has not established policies to protect Mexican businesses."

But "protection" for some businesses is corporate welfare -- welfare for the rich. It hurts poor people by raising prices. The Times wants that? Maybe they're sucking up to Donald Trump and his friend Carlos Slim, Mexico's richest crony capitalist, and the Times' biggest shareholder.

--Friday:

A front-page story smears David and Charles Koch.

First, the reporter labels them "the ultraconservative billionaire brothers." Ultra? Why ultra? Why conservative even?

The Kochs favor liberal immigration rules, gay marriage, legal drugs, ending racial discrimination in criminal sentencing, fighting in fewer foreign wars and getting rid of government bailouts and favors for businesses, including their own. David Koch supports higher taxes to reduce the deficit. Which of those things is conservative?!

Maybe the Times calls the Kochs "ultraconservative" because a political group they support points out, "Policies that subsidize electric vehicles and solar panels for the wealthy raise energy prices" and gas and oil are cheaper for everyone. The reporter adds that the group even showed a "video of people driving, turning on lights and plugging in appliances." Oh, no! How terrible!

The reporter claims the "Kochs have long worked to quash ... renewable energy sources like wind and solar." But they haven't! They try to quash subsidies for renewables. Big difference. Doesn't the Times know the difference?

The Times appeals to its Trump-hating readers with a headline that begins "Sensing Gains Ahead Under Trump, the Kochs ..." But the Kochs didn't give Trump a penny.

It's time for the Times to stop calling all their opponents "conservatives." Some of us are libertarians. America has other choices besides the anti-capitalism of the Times and anti-capitalism of Trump.

--Saturday:

The Times quotes left-wing New York Governor Andrew Cuomo saying it "defies common sense" to have a nuclear power plant near New York City. Green activists oppose the plant and Cuomo now says it will close.

But where will New Yorkers get power? The "options include hydropower from Quebec and power from wind farms."

Great. But what will we do when the wind doesn't blow? At least the reporter admits that "New York City could be burdened with higher energy prices." Could be? Will be!

--Sunday:

"Trump Denies Climate Change, These Kids Die."

That's the headline on a Nicholas Kristof column about drought in southern Africa. Apparently, there were no dry spells before "man-made global warming."

In truth, starvation has decreased dramatically thanks to fossil fuels. Starvation now is caused by corrupt governments, not climate change.

If there's a way to blame capitalism even as it improves the world, the Times will find it.

John Stossel is the author of "No They Can't! Why Government Fails -- But Individuals Succeed." For other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 BY JFS PRODUCTIONS INC.