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"Ellie" Amy Rodriguez has been promoted from Account Executive to Senior Account Executive at Red Energy Public Relations, Advertising & Events where she will provide media relations support, social media management and oversee client accounts.

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"Fake News!" shouts our president, calling out CNN, The New York Times and others.

I love it.

Although it's not really true -- not the way President Donald Trump means it. The media rarely "fake" anything. Over time, they generally get the facts correct.

But the president makes a good point: The smug lamestream media spin left but won't admit it.

At ABC News, my colleagues acted as if I was the only guy in the building with an opinion. Everyone else was "in the middle." This was nonsense. Almost all were leftists. They constantly pushed big government. Their bias was revealed in questions they asked, the "experts" they chose to interview and their endless calls for political correctness and new regulation.

Unfortunately, Trump is now just as ridiculous, claiming that "crime is reaching record levels" when it's half what it was 25 years ago. He claimed, "We had a very smooth rollout of the travel ban," and that he had "the biggest electoral college win since Reagan," and so on.

This is absurd. Facts are facts. Trump shouldn't make things up.

But I still love his "Fake!" tweets because much of what media spew is misleading.

I did it myself. On "20/20," my consumer reports covered exploding coffee pots and risks posed by pesticides used on lawns. ("Danger in the Grass!")

These weren't lies. A few personal injury lawyers did have clients injured by coffee pots. One man's skin peeled off after he played golf on a freshly sprayed course. The injuries were horrible.

But in terms of consumer protection, this "news" was irrelevant and misleading. It's a big country. Rare and horrible things happen. I wised up eventually, realizing that those threats distract people from real threats, like driving in the rain, drinking too much, smoking, etc.

But my peers continue to terrify people about trivial or nonexistent threats from power lines, hair dye, saccharin, NutraSweet, Teflon pans, electric blankets, computer terminals, cellphones, "killer" bees and more. They win awards for it.

In 1999, the media said planes would crash because computers couldn't handle the switch to the year 2000. Now they claim global warming will drown us if we don't honor meaningless climate treaties. They imply that polar bears are vanishing, although scientists studying 13 polar bear populations found "12 stable/increasing and one declining."

Friday, Trump varied his attack, calling The New York Times, NBC, ABC, CBS and CNN "the enemy of the American people."

Enemy?

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It was Nobel laureate economist Milton Friedman who made famous the adage, "There's no such thing as a free lunch." Professor Friedman could have added that there is a difference between something's being free and something's having a zero price. For example, people say that there's free public education and there are free libraries, but public education and libraries cost money. Proof that they have costs is the fact that somebody has to have less of something by giving up tax money so that schools and libraries can be produced and operated. A much more accurate statement is that we have zero-price public education and libraries.

Costs can be concealed but not eliminated. If people ignore costs and look only to benefits, they will do darn near anything, because everything has a benefit. Politicians love the fact that costs can easily be concealed. The call for import restrictions, in the name of saving jobs, is politically popular in some quarters. But few talk about the costs. We know there are costs because nothing is free.

Let's start with a hypothetical example of tariff costs. Suppose a U.S. clothing manufacturer wants to sell a suit for $200. He is prevented from doing so because customers can purchase a nearly identical suit produced by a foreign manufacturer for $150. But suppose the clothing manufacturer can get Congress to impose a $60 tariff on foreign suits in the name of leveling the playing field and fair trade. What happens to his chances of being able to sell his suit for $200? If you answered that his chances increase, go to the head of the class. Next question is: Who bears the burden of the tariff? If you answered that it's customers who must pay $50 more for a suit, you're right again.

In his 2012 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama boasted that "over 1,000 Americans are working today because we stopped a surge in Chinese tires." According to a study done by the Peterson Institute for International Economics (http://tinyurl.com/jdtbktu), those trade restrictions forced Americans to pay $1.1 billion in higher prices for tires. So though 1,200 jobs were saved in the U.S. tire industry, the cost per job saved was at least $900,000 in that year. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average annual salary of tire builders in 2011 was $40,070.

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To say it's speculative at this point might be an understatement, but it sounds like Dragonman would like to make it happen.

This is from a February 18 post on the Dragonman Facebook page.

"Dragonman's Drag Strip UPDATE:
I got a very important phone call yesterday that the owners of this property would finally like to sell it. They are working out a price and how many acres I would like/need. It has to be sub-divided from hundreds of connecting acres. That is the first hurdle, the second hurdle will be agreeing on a price and the third hurdle will be getting it all rebuilt and restored!! This is the old drag strip and oval track that closed around 1986!

I walked out there yesterday, from Hwy. 94 a mile and a half each way, after the phone call and took these photos! As you can see the whole thing has to be ripped up and redone! The most important thing about this Drag Strip is it is still zoned for a drag strip/race track. As Colorado Springs is building up very fast, nobody would really approve a drag strip close to their homes. So the fact that it is already zoned is very important and crucial to the development! This is the only thing that Colorado Springs is really missing! I am trying my best to make this happen! Wish me luck because I know you guys really want this!!±"

Good luck! For more information about Dragonman visit http://www.dragonmans.com/ or the Dragonmans FB page.

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Press Release


Griffis/Blessing has been selected by TP Gold Hill, LLC to manage the Gold Hill Shopping Center in Woodland Park, CO. The 72,227 square foot retail center, located at 741-799 Gold Hill Place South, is home to fifteen tenants and is anchored by City Market and Wendy’s.

Rita Dugan, Property Manager, and Elizabeth Miller, Portfolio Assistant, will oversee the day-to-day operations with the assistance of Cindy Colby, Property Accountant. NAI Highland is handling the leasing for the property.
 
“The opportunity to manage this shopping center for a new owner out of Utah is very exciting as it expands our management footprint in Woodland Park. Our quality customer service and expertise in the management of retail shopping centers along the Front Rage were key factors in being selected to manage this property.” says Senior Vice President, Richard K. Davidson, CPM®. “With this new addition, we now manage over 990,000 square feet of retail space.”
 
Headquartered in Colorado Springs, CO with an additional office in Denver, Griffis/Blessing, Inc. is Southern Colorado’s largest property manager of commercial and multifamily properties. Griffis/Blessing, Inc currently manages over 4 million square feet of commercial space, and more than 9,300 apartment units along the Front Range. The company has been providing award-winning property management and real estate investment services since 1985. For more information, visit www.griffisblessing.com.