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Press Release

Tara Custom Homes located in Colorado Springs Colorado donated over 400 hotel cabinets and doors from a hotel remodel. The donor has valued the donation at approximately at $200,000.00. Tara Custom Homes web site is www.taracustom.com.
 
Paul Rising President of Tara Custom Homes contacted the local Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity ReStore to make the arrangements for the cabinets to be delivered to the Habitat ReStore.  The ReStore is located at 411 South Wahsatch Ave Colorado Springs Colorado 80903 phone 719-477-0840.
 
Steve Church, Director of Retail & Business Development, was appreciative of the generous donation from Tara Custom Homes. The generosity of donations like this helps Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity build decent and affordable housing here in El Paso County Colorado and help families obtain the American Dream of homeownership.

The Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity ReStore is one of 855 Habitat ReStores in the United States and Canada which accepts donations of home improvement items and resells them at a fraction of the cost to generate revenue to help build homes for low income families here is El Paso County Colorado.
 
Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity is one of over 1,500 Habitat for Humanity Affiliates located in the United States.
 
Since 1983 Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity has built or rehabilitated 150 homes with families in El Paso.  For more information about Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity visit the affiliate web site at www.pikespeakhabitat.org.

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Now that I no longer do a weekly TV show, I have more time to read my local paper. Sadly, that's The New York Times.

The Times actually does some good reporting, but their political and economic coverage is filled with deceit.

Can I find deceit every day? You bet. Take a look at a few days just last week.

--Thursday:

The front page: "NAFTA's promise is falling short, Mexicans agree."

Wow, the Times now embraces Donald Trump's position on trade? Economists estimate that 14 million jobs depend upon NAFTA, but people everywhere often oppose trade because the smaller number of jobs lost is more visible than gradual gains.

What evidence of NAFTA's failings does the Times offer? Oddly, the article says "the workforce has grown."

Ah, hello? Job growth is good.

Jose Luis Rico "earns well under $10,000 a year."

Not much by American standards, but good for Latin America, and the reporter mentions that Rico got "a handful of raises."

Have you gotten "a handful of raises"?

Despite NAFTA, the "gap between the nation's rich and poor persists."

Duh. Trade doesn't eliminate wealth gaps -- it may increase the gap because the cleverest traders get rich. But since the poor gain jobs and wealth, too, so what?

Finally, the clueless Times reporter quotes a Mexican politician and crony capitalist complaining: "Government has not established policies to protect Mexican businesses."

But "protection" for some businesses is corporate welfare -- welfare for the rich. It hurts poor people by raising prices. The Times wants that? Maybe they're sucking up to Donald Trump and his friend Carlos Slim, Mexico's richest crony capitalist, and the Times' biggest shareholder.

--Friday:

A front-page story smears David and Charles Koch.

First, the reporter labels them "the ultraconservative billionaire brothers." Ultra? Why ultra? Why conservative even?

The Kochs favor liberal immigration rules, gay marriage, legal drugs, ending racial discrimination in criminal sentencing, fighting in fewer foreign wars and getting rid of government bailouts and favors for businesses, including their own. David Koch supports higher taxes to reduce the deficit. Which of those things is conservative?!

Maybe the Times calls the Kochs "ultraconservative" because a political group they support points out, "Policies that subsidize electric vehicles and solar panels for the wealthy raise energy prices" and gas and oil are cheaper for everyone. The reporter adds that the group even showed a "video of people driving, turning on lights and plugging in appliances." Oh, no! How terrible!

The reporter claims the "Kochs have long worked to quash ... renewable energy sources like wind and solar." But they haven't! They try to quash subsidies for renewables. Big difference. Doesn't the Times know the difference?

The Times appeals to its Trump-hating readers with a headline that begins "Sensing Gains Ahead Under Trump, the Kochs ..." But the Kochs didn't give Trump a penny.

It's time for the Times to stop calling all their opponents "conservatives." Some of us are libertarians. America has other choices besides the anti-capitalism of the Times and anti-capitalism of Trump.

--Saturday:

The Times quotes left-wing New York Governor Andrew Cuomo saying it "defies common sense" to have a nuclear power plant near New York City. Green activists oppose the plant and Cuomo now says it will close.

But where will New Yorkers get power? The "options include hydropower from Quebec and power from wind farms."

Great. But what will we do when the wind doesn't blow? At least the reporter admits that "New York City could be burdened with higher energy prices." Could be? Will be!

--Sunday:

"Trump Denies Climate Change, These Kids Die."

That's the headline on a Nicholas Kristof column about drought in southern Africa. Apparently, there were no dry spells before "man-made global warming."

In truth, starvation has decreased dramatically thanks to fossil fuels. Starvation now is caused by corrupt governments, not climate change.

If there's a way to blame capitalism even as it improves the world, the Times will find it.

John Stossel is the author of "No They Can't! Why Government Fails -- But Individuals Succeed." For other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 BY JFS PRODUCTIONS INC.

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The FBI reported that the total number of homicides in 2015 was 15,696. Blacks were about 52
percent of homicide victims. That means about 8,100 black lives were ended violently, and over 90 percent of the time, the perpetrator was another black. Listening to the news media and the Black Lives Matter movement, one would think that black deaths at the hands of police are the major problem. It turns out that in 2015, police across the nation shot and killed 986 people. Of that number, 495 were white (50 percent), 258 were black (26 percent) and 172 Hispanic (17 percent). A study of 2,699 fatal police killings between 2013 and 2015, conducted by John R. Lott Jr. and Carlisle E. Moody of the Crime Prevention Research Center, demonstrates that the odds of a black suspect's being killed by a black police officer were consistently greater than a black suspect's getting killed by a white officer. Politicians, race hustlers and the news media keep such studies under wraps because these studies don't help their narrative about racist cops.

The homicide victim is not the only victim, whether he is a criminal or not, for there are mourning loved ones. No one ever fully recovers from having a son, daughter, husband, mother or father murdered. Murder is not the only crime that takes a heavy toll on the black community. Blacks are disproportionately represented as victims in every category of violent crime -- e.g., forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault.

Today's level of lawlessness and insecurity in many black communities is a relatively new phenomenon. In the 1930s, '40s and '50s, people didn't bar their windows. Doors were often left unlocked. People didn't go to bed with the sounds of gunshots. What changed everything was the liberal vision that blamed crime on poverty and racial discrimination. Academic liberals and hustling politicians told us that to deal with crime, we had to deal with those "root causes." Plus, courts began granting criminals new rights that caused murder and other violent crime rates to skyrocket. The liberals' argument ignores the fact that there was far greater civility in black neighborhoods at a time when there was far greater poverty and discrimination.

The presence of criminals, having driven many businesses out, forces residents to bear the costs of shopping outside their neighborhoods. Fearing robberies, taxi drivers -- including black drivers -- often refuse to do home pickups in black neighborhoods and frequently pass up black customers hailing them. Plus, there's the insult associated with not being able to receive pizza or other deliveries on the same terms as people in other neighborhoods.

In low-crime neighborhoods, FedEx, UPS and other delivery companies routinely leave packages that contain valuable merchandise on a doorstep if no one is at home. That saves the expense of redelivery or recipients from having to go pick up the packages. In low-crime communities, supermarket managers may leave plants, fertilizer and other home and garden items outdoors, often unattended and overnight. They display merchandise at entryways and exits. Where there is less honesty, supermarkets cannot use all the space that they lease, and hence they are less profitable. In high-crime neighborhoods, delivery companies leaving packages at the door and supermarkets leaving goods outside unattended would be equivalent to economic suicide.

Politicians who call for law and order are often viewed negatively, but poor people are the most dependent on law and order. In the face of high crime or social disorder, wealthier people can afford to purchase alarm systems, buy guard dogs, hire guards and, if things get too bad, move to a gated community. These options are not available to poor people. The only protection they have is an orderly society.

Ultimately, the solution to high crime rests with black people. Given the current political environment, it doesn't pay a black or white politician to take those steps necessary to crack down on lawlessness in black communities.

Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. To find out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

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U-Haul Company of Colorado is pleased to announce that Colorado Springs Indoor Flea Market has signed on as a U-Haul neighborhood dealer to serve the Colorado Springs community.

Colorado Springs Indoor Flea Market at 2561 Airport Road will offer U-Haul trucks, towing equipment, support rental items and in-store pick-up for boxes.

Hours of operation for U-Haul rentals are 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday and Sunday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday.

Reserve U-Haul products at this dealer location by calling (719) 630-0853 or visiting https://www.uhaul.com/Locations/Truck-Rentals-near-Colorado-Springs-CO-80910/006661/ today.
Colorado Springs Indoor Flea Market owner Betty Casper is proud to team with the industry leader in do-it-yourself moving and self-storage to better meet the demands of El Paso County.

U-Haul and Colorado Springs Indoor Flea Market are striving to benefit the environment through sustainability initiatives. Truck sharing is a core U-Haul sustainability business practice that allows individuals to access a fleet of trucks that is larger than what they could access on an individual basis.

Every U-Haul truck placed in a community helps keep 19 personally owned large-capacity vehicles, pickups, SUVs and vans off the road. Fewer vehicles means less traffic congestion, less pollution, less fuel burned and cleaner air.

Colorado Springs Indoor Flea Market is a great place to become U-Haul Famous®. Take your picture in front of a U-Haul product, send it in and your face could land on the side of a U-Haul truck. Upload your photo through Instagram using #uhaulfamous, or go to www.uhaulfamous.com to submit photos and learn more.

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“Folks, Colorado Springs is a great place to live, work and play, and word has gotten out.”
-Mayor John Suthers

Press Release (City of Colorado Springs)

The City of Colorado Springs experienced positive growth and improvements in multiple areas during 2016, earning a place on no fewer than 12 notable “top 10” city ranking lists. New business startups and relocations, low unemployment and excellent quality of life were just some of the city’s attributes earning national recognition.  

Already a major destination for travelers, prominent publications such as U.S. News & World Reports, Livability.com and WalletHub ranked COS as a “best city” within its top 10 lists proving that the 40th largest city in the nation is not only a great place to visit, but is also a great place to live.

Overall Awards:

# 9  Best in the Mountains City by Money Magazine

o   Reviewed metro areas (300,000+) with strong job growth, affordable housing, good schools, low crime and great quality of life factor i.e. transportation and green space.

#5  Best Places to Live by U.S. News & World Report

o   Cities were ranked an evaluated by the following indexes: job market, value, quality of life, desirability, and net migration.

#4  Best Midsize Cities for New Grads by OnlineDegrees.com

o   Cities were graded on a 10 point scale for rents, population age, degree earnings, arts and entertainment, job growth projections and area unemployment rate.

#4  Best Large City to Live in by WalletHub

o   Compared 62 cities with population over 300,000 in livability, education health and local economy and taxes.